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VIRSH: Virtualizing a Physical Rocky 8 Linux Machine

Let’s just jump right in into virtualizing a KVM based Physical Server using various KVM tools such as Virsh, Cockpit etc.  Will also introduce a twist by configuring bonding at the end, not the beginning, to document a retrofit to an existing environment. Begin by identifying how the various network interfaces that will make up the setup:

[root@dl380g6-p02 network-scripts]# ip a
1: lo: <LOOPBACK,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 65536 qdisc noqueue state UNKNOWN group default qlen 1000
link/loopback 00:00:00:00:00:00 brd 00:00:00:00:00:00
inet 127.0.0.1/8 scope host lo
valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
inet6 ::1/128 scope host
valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
2: enp2s0f0: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1500 qdisc mq state UP group default qlen 1000
link/ether 78:e7:d1:8f:4d:26 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
inet 10.3.0.10/24 brd 10.3.0.255 scope global noprefixroute enp2s0f0
valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
inet6 fe80::7ae7:d1ff:fe8f:4d26/64 scope link
valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
3: enp2s0f1: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1500 qdisc mq state UP group default qlen 1000
link/ether 78:e7:d1:8f:4d:28 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
4: enp3s0f0: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1500 qdisc mq state UP group default qlen 1000
link/ether 78:e7:d1:8f:4d:2a brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
5: enp3s0f1: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1500 qdisc mq state UP group default qlen 1000
link/ether 78:e7:d1:8f:4d:2c brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
[root@dl380g6-p02 network-scripts]#

Begin by installing libvirt (These two commands must be separate for some reason.):

dnf install @virt
dnf install libvirt-devel virt-top libguestfs-tools wget virt-install virt-viewer

Download Rocky Linux 9 ISO (In this case in /mnt/iso-images folder, after creating it ):

# cd /mnt/iso-images && wget https://download.rockylinux.org/pub/rocky/9/isos/x86_64/Rocky-9.1-x86_64-minimal.iso

Create the directory where thin provisioned drives will exist:

[root@dl380g6-p02 mnt]# mkdir kvm-drives
[root@dl380g6-p02 mnt]# cd kvm-drives/
[root@dl380g6-p02 kvm-drives]# pwd
/mnt/kvm-drives
[root@dl380g6-p02 kvm-drives]#

Enable libvirtd and confirm:

# virsh list –all
# systemctl enable –now libvirtd
# systemctl status libvirtd

Create the disks:

# qemu-img create -f qcow2 /mnt/kvm-drives/mc-rocky01.nix.mds.xyz-disk01.qcow2 32G
# qemu-img create -f qcow2 /mnt/kvm-drives/mc-rocky01.nix.mds.xyz-disk02.qcow2 64G

Then check them:

# qemu-img info /mnt/kvm-drives/mc-rocky01.nix.mds.xyz-disk01.qcow2
# qemu-img info /mnt/kvm-drives/mc-rocky01.nix.mds.xyz-disk02.qcow2

# qemu-img info /mnt/kvm-drives/mc-rocky01.nix.mds.xyz-disk01.qcow2
image: /mnt/kvm-drives/mc-rocky01.nix.mds.xyz-disk01.qcow2
file format: qcow2
virtual size: 32 GiB (34359738368 bytes)
disk size: 196 KiB
cluster_size: 65536
Format specific information:
compat: 1.1
compression type: zlib
lazy refcounts: false
refcount bits: 16
corrupt: false
extended l2: false
# qemu-img info /mnt/kvm-drives/mc-rocky01.nix.mds.xyz-disk02.qcow2
image: /mnt/kvm-drives/mc-rocky01.nix.mds.xyz-disk02.qcow2
file format: qcow2
virtual size: 64 GiB (68719476736 bytes)
disk size: 196 KiB
cluster_size: 65536
Format specific information:
compat: 1.1
compression type: zlib
lazy refcounts: false
refcount bits: 16
corrupt: false
extended l2: false
[root@dl380g6-p02 kvm-drives]#

Clear all previous definitions in nmcli.  For example:

# nmcli c delete enp2s0f0
# nmcli c delete enp2s0f1
# nmcli c delete enp3s0f0
# nmcli c delete enp3s0f1

# nmcli c delete br0
# nmcli c delete bridge-slave-enp2s0f0

Define bridged networking:

# virsh net-list –all
# nmcli con add ifname br0 type bridge con-name br0 ipv4.addresses 10.3.0.10/24 ipv4.gateway 10.3.0.1 ipv4.dns “192.168.0.46 192.168.0.51 192.168.0.224” ipv4.method manual
# nmcli con add type bridge-slave ifname enp2s0f0 master br0
# nmcli c s

Next, bring the physical interface offline and the bridge interface online.  This is best done via the console since networking will be offline causing you to loose connection.  Check and verify:

# nmcli c down enp2s0f0
# nmcli c up br0
# nmcli c show
# nmcli c show –active
# virsh net-list –all

IMPORTANT: If the default route is missing which can be confirmed with ip r or netstat -nr, add it in otherwise reaching out to the internet will not work.  For example:

ip route add 192.168.0.0/24 dev net0
ip route add default via 192.168.0.1 dev net0

Next, define the br0 interface in virsh.  Save this content to br0.xml:

<network>
  <name>br0</name>
  <forward mode="bridge"/>
  <bridge name="br0" />
</network>

Next, import the configuration:

# virsh net-define ./br0.xml

Enable autostart and verify:

# virsh net-start br0
# virsh net-autostart br0
# virsh net-list –all

Create a virtual machine:

# virt-install \
–name mc-rocky01.nix.mds.xyz \
–ram 4096 \
–vcpus 4 \
–disk path=/mnt/kvm-drives/mc-rocky01.nix.mds.xyz-disk01.qcow2 \
–disk path=/mnt/kvm-drives/mc-rocky01.nix.mds.xyz-disk02.qcow2 \
–os-variant centos-stream9 \
–os-type linux \
–network bridge=br0,model=virtio \
–graphics vnc,listen=0.0.0.0 \
–console pty,target_type=serial \
–location /mnt/iso-images/Rocky-9.1-x86_64-minimal.iso

NOTE: If the image is in a location that is not accessible, such as /root/, this error will be seen:

ERROR    internal error: process exited while connecting to monitor: 2023-01-23T01:54:21.710369Z qemu-kvm: -blockdev {“driver”:”file”,”filename”:”/root/Rocky-9.1-x86_64-minimal.iso”,”node-name”:”libvirt-1-storage”,”auto-read-only”:true,”discard”:”unmap”}: Could not open ‘/root/Rocky-9.1-x86_64-minimal.iso’: Permission denied

ANOTHER NOTE: If using –extra-args=’console=ttyS0′ to the above virt-install or –nographics, the VNC, SPICE or other graphics options will be skipped and a text based installation will begin.  In this case, the VNC route will be taken though SPICE will also be discussed.

Login to the console and monitor the installation, answering any questions in the process:

# virsh
Welcome to virsh, the virtualization interactive terminal.

Type:  ‘help’ for help with commands
‘quit’ to quit

virsh #

virsh # list
Id   Name                     State
—————————————-
2    mc-rocky01.nix.mds.xyz   running

virsh # console mc-rocky01.nix.mds.xyz
Connected to domain ‘mc-rocky01.nix.mds.xyz’
Escape character is ^] (Ctrl + ])

If there’s not activity, look for a message such as this:

WARNING  Unable to connect to graphical console: virt-viewer not installed. Please install the ‘virt-viewer’ package.
WARNING  No console to launch for the guest, defaulting to –wait -1

Install virt-viewer if not already (see above).  Once installed, find the port on which your new virtual machine is running on:

# netstat -pnltu|grep -Ei qemu
tcp        0      0 0.0.0.0:5900            0.0.0.0:*               LISTEN      7141/qemu-kvm

And verify the machine name from the process table output:

# ps -ef | grep -Ei 7141
qemu        7141       1 19 20:56 ?        00:01:42 /usr/libexec/qemu-kvm -name guest=mc-rocky01.nix.mds.xyz,debug-threads=on -S -object {“qom-type”:”secret”,”id”:”masterKey0″,”format”:”raw”,”file”:”/var/lib/libvirt/qemu/domain-2-mc-rocky01.nix.mds.x/master-key.aes”} -machine pc-q35-rhel8.6.0,usb=off,dump-guest-core=off,memory-backend=pc.ram -accel kvm -cpu Nehalem-IBRS,vme=on,pdcm=on,x2apic=on,tsc-deadline=on,hypervisor=on,arat=on,tsc-adjust=on,umip=on,stibp=on,arch-capabilities=on,ssbd=on,rdtscp=on,ibpb=on,ibrs=on,amd-stibp=on,amd-ssbd=on,skip-l1dfl-vmentry=on,pschange-mc-no=on -m 4096 -object {“qom-type”:”memory-backend-ram”,”id”:”pc.ram”,”size”:4294967296} -overcommit mem-lock=off -smp 4,sockets=4,cores=1,threads=1 -uuid 9ba74db1-1cdf-4940-b108-e9ad9cdb31b5 -no-user-config -nodefaults -chardev socket,id=charmonitor,fd=39,server=on,wait=off -mon chardev=charmonitor,id=monitor,mode=control -rtc base=utc,driftfix=slew -global kvm-pit.lost_tick_policy=delay -no-hpet -no-shutdown -global ICH9-LPC.disable_s3=1 -global ICH9-LPC.disable_s4=1 -boot strict=on -kernel /var/lib/libvirt/boot/virtinst-q_1nkyy8-vmlinuz -initrd /var/lib/libvirt/boot/virtinst-nhyry5q7-initrd.img -device pcie-root-port,port=16,chassis=1,id=pci.1,bus=pcie.0,multifunction=on,addr=0x2 -device pcie-root-port,port=17,chassis=2,id=pci.2,bus=pcie.0,addr=0x2.0x1 -device pcie-root-port,port=18,chassis=3,id=pci.3,bus=pcie.0,addr=0x2.0x2 -device pcie-root-port,port=19,chassis=4,id=pci.4,bus=pcie.0,addr=0x2.0x3 -device pcie-root-port,port=20,chassis=5,id=pci.5,bus=pcie.0,addr=0x2.0x4 -device pcie-root-port,port=21,chassis=6,id=pci.6,bus=pcie.0,addr=0x2.0x5 -device pcie-root-port,port=22,chassis=7,id=pci.7,bus=pcie.0,addr=0x2.0x6 -device pcie-root-port,port=23,chassis=8,id=pci.8,bus=pcie.0,addr=0x2.0x7 -device qemu-xhci,p2=15,p3=15,id=usb,bus=pci.2,addr=0x0 -device virtio-serial-pci,id=virtio-serial0,bus=pci.3,addr=0x0 -blockdev {“driver”:”file”,”filename”:”/mnt/kvm-drives/mc-rocky01.nix.mds.xyz-disk01.qcow2″,”node-name”:”libvirt-3-storage”,”auto-read-only”:true,”discard”:”unmap”} -blockdev {“node-name”:”libvirt-3-format”,”read-only”:false,”driver”:”qcow2″,”file”:”libvirt-3-storage”,”backing”:null} -device virtio-blk-pci,bus=pci.4,addr=0x0,drive=libvirt-3-format,id=virtio-disk0,bootindex=1 -blockdev {“driver”:”file”,”filename”:”/mnt/kvm-drives/mc-rocky01.nix.mds.xyz-disk02.qcow2″,”node-name”:”libvirt-2-storage”,”auto-read-only”:true,”discard”:”unmap”} -blockdev {“node-name”:”libvirt-2-format”,”read-only”:false,”driver”:”qcow2″,”file”:”libvirt-2-storage”,”backing”:null} -device virtio-blk-pci,bus=pci.5,addr=0x0,drive=libvirt-2-format,id=virtio-disk1 -blockdev {“driver”:”file”,”filename”:”/mnt/iso-images/Rocky-9.1-x86_64-minimal.iso”,”node-name”:”libvirt-1-storage”,”auto-read-only”:true,”discard”:”unmap”} -blockdev {“node-name”:”libvirt-1-format”,”read-only”:true,”driver”:”raw”,”file”:”libvirt-1-storage”} -device ide-cd,bus=ide.0,drive=libvirt-1-format,id=sata0-0-0 -netdev tap,fd=40,id=hostnet0,vhost=on,vhostfd=42 -device virtio-net-pci,netdev=hostnet0,id=net0,mac=52:54:00:cb:13:ba,bus=pci.1,addr=0x0 -chardev pty,id=charserial0 -device isa-serial,chardev=charserial0,id=serial0 -chardev socket,id=charchannel0,fd=38,server=on,wait=off -device virtserialport,bus=virtio-serial0.0,nr=1,chardev=charchannel0,id=channel0,name=org.qemu.guest_agent.0 -device usb-tablet,id=input0,bus=usb.0,port=1 -audiodev {“id”:”audio1″,”driver”:”none”} -vnc 0.0.0.0:0,audiodev=audio1 -device VGA,id=video0,vgamem_mb=16,bus=pcie.0,addr=0x1 -device virtio-balloon-pci,id=balloon0,bus=pci.6,addr=0x0 -object {“qom-type”:”rng-random”,”id”:”objrng0″,”filename”:”/dev/urandom”} -device virtio-rng-pci,rng=objrng0,id=rng0,bus=pci.7,addr=0x0 -sandbox on,obsolete=deny,elevateprivileges=deny,spawn=deny,resourcecontrol=deny -msg timestamp=on

# ip a
9: br0: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1500 qdisc noqueue state UP group default qlen 1000
link/ether 78:e7:d1:8f:4d:26 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
inet 10.3.0.10/24 brd 10.3.0.255 scope global noprefixroute br0
valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
inet6 fe80::1af2:4625:48b7:9030/64 scope link noprefixroute
valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever

Next, let’s connect to the graphical interface by specifying the IP and above VNC port to view the Graphical install.  Before we do so, we’ll need a plugin for our Chrome first:

Chrome Web Store
Home / Apps / Spice Client

Or just search on google.  Once installed, click on launch app to login to a client.  However, this failed for us.  Instead, let’s download the Win x64 client instead:

https://virt-manager.org/download/

Look for the Win x64 MSI (gpg) text on the page.  Virt-viewer will get instaleld in something like C:\Program Files\VirtViewer v11.0-256.  Browse to C:\Program Files\VirtViewer v11.0-256\bin folder then start remote-viewer.exe:

https://i0.wp.com/www.microdevsys.com/WordPressImages/virsh-kvm-configuration-virt-viewer-connection-setup.png?ssl=1

However, the above will only work if the graphics specified is spice:

–graphics spice,listen=0.0.0.0

The corresponding element in the xml files is:

<graphics type=’spice’ autoport=’yes’ listen=’0.0.0.0′>
<listen type=’address’ address=’0.0.0.0’/>
</graphics>

However, in our case we used VNC.  In this case, the VNC Viewer is required.   That’s a different kind of animal:

https://www.realvnc.com/en/connect/download/viewer/

Establish a connection and continue with the Rocky 9 setup:

https://i0.wp.com/www.microdevsys.com/WordPressImages/virsh-kvm-configuration-vnc-viewer-connection-setup.png?ssl=1

https://i0.wp.com/www.microdevsys.com/WordPressImages/virsh-kvm-configuration-vnc-viewer-connection-setup-rocky-install-screen01.png?ssl=1

Continue with the install making the appropriate selections.  Note the dual disk drives specified in the virt-install command.  They’re available for our install:

https://i0.wp.com/www.microdevsys.com/WordPressImages/virsh-kvm-configuration-vnc-viewer-connection-setup-rocky-install-drive-selection.png?ssl=1

Suppose Network parameters could have been configured however, point is to test DHCP across the bridge interface br0.  Once installed:

# virt-install \
> –name mc-rocky01.nix.mds.xyz \
> –ram 4096 \
> –vcpus 4 \
> –disk path=/mnt/kvm-drives/mc-rocky01.nix.mds.xyz-disk01.qcow2 \
> –disk path=/mnt/kvm-drives/mc-rocky01.nix.mds.xyz-disk02.qcow2 \
> –os-variant centos-stream9 \
> –os-type linux \
> –network bridge=br0,model=virtio \
> –graphics vnc,listen=0.0.0.0 \
> –console pty,target_type=serial \
> –location /mnt/iso-images/Rocky-9.1-x86_64-minimal.iso
WARNING  Unable to connect to graphical console: virt-viewer not installed. Please install the ‘virt-viewer’ package.
WARNING  No console to launch for the guest, defaulting to –wait -1

Starting install…
Retrieving file vmlinuz…                                                                                                                          |  11 MB  00:00:00
Retrieving file initrd.img…                                                                                                                       |  88 MB  00:00:00

Domain is still running. Installation may be in progress.
Waiting for the installation to complete.

Domain has shutdown. Continuing.
Domain creation completed.
Restarting guest.

#

verify the IP given once the machine is back up (If prompted for a disk password, since we choose encryption, enter it and proceed with the boot):

https://i0.wp.com/www.microdevsys.com/WordPressImages/virsh-kvm-configuration-guest-dhcp-works.png?ssl=1

Take the time to set the hostname, as per the above image:

# hostnamectl set-hostname mc-rocky01.nix.mds.xyz

Now it’s time to test the connectivity from our Windows 10 Laptop:

Using username “root”.
root@10.3.0.179’s password:
Last login: Sun Jan 22 22:19:46 2023
[root@mc-rocky01 ~]#
[root@mc-rocky01 ~]#
[root@mc-rocky01 ~]#
[root@mc-rocky01 ~]# ip a
1: lo: <LOOPBACK,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 65536 qdisc noqueue state UNKNOWN group default qlen 1000
link/loopback 00:00:00:00:00:00 brd 00:00:00:00:00:00
inet 127.0.0.1/8 scope host lo
valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
inet6 ::1/128 scope host
valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
2: enp1s0: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1500 qdisc fq_codel state UP group default qlen 1000
link/ether 52:54:00:cb:13:ba brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
inet 10.3.0.179/24 brd 10.3.0.255 scope global dynamic noprefixroute enp1s0
valid_lft 3107sec preferred_lft 3107sec
inet6 fe80::5054:ff:fecb:13ba/64 scope link noprefixroute
valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
[root@mc-rocky01 ~]#
[root@mc-rocky01 ~]#
[root@mc-rocky01 ~]# cat /etc/resolv.conf
# Generated by NetworkManager
search nix.mds.xyz mws.mds.xyz mds.xyz
nameserver 192.168.0.46
nameserver 192.168.0.51
nameserver 192.168.0.224
[root@mc-rocky01 ~]#

Note how the DHCP server populated all DNS servers according to the DHCP configuration defined.  Hence external resolution from the KVM guest works and is able to reach out to online sites and resources.  Virsh lists a running machine:

[root@dl380g6-p02 iso-images]# virsh list –all
Id   Name                     State
—————————————-
3    mc-rocky01.nix.mds.xyz   running

[root@dl380g6-p02 iso-images]#

and fdisk from the guest KVM machine lists the correct drives:

[root@mc-rocky01 ~]# fdisk -l
Disk /dev/vda: 32 GiB, 34359738368 bytes, 67108864 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: dos
Disk identifier: 0xfbc22483

Device     Boot   Start      End  Sectors Size Id Type
/dev/vda1  *       2048  2099199  2097152   1G 83 Linux
/dev/vda2       2099200 67108863 65009664  31G 83 Linux

Disk /dev/vdb: 64 GiB, 68719476736 bytes, 134217728 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes

…………………….

[root@mc-rocky01 ~]

Check block ID’s:

[root@mc-rocky01 ~]# blkid /dev/vdb
[root@mc-rocky01 ~]# blkid /dev/vda
/dev/vda: PTUUID=”fbc22483″ PTTYPE=”dos”
[root@mc-rocky01 ~]# blkid /dev/vda1
/dev/vda1: UUID=”6d234e64-426d-46d1-a0de-fb4dd0080283″ TYPE=”xfs” PARTUUID=”fbc22483-01″
[root@mc-rocky01 ~]#

Time to configure bonding (AKA teaming) to retrofit it into the mix for some HA over the 4 NIC’s.  As before, since the network configuration will be adjusted, connectivity will be lost.  It’s a good idea to have the console handy: Before doing anything, remove all the configurations (Don’t worry about KVM, it will begin to work again once we redefine br01):

# nmcli c
# nmcli c delete br0
# nmcli c delete bridge-slave-enp2s0f0

There should be nothing defined:

# nmcli c
NAME      UUID                                  TYPE                          DEVICE

and the /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts folder should be empty.  Next, let’s define the bonding interfaces based on the previous configuration above.  The earlier commands:

# nmcli connection add type bond con-name bond0 ifname bond0 bond.options “mode=active-backup,miimon=100” ipv4.method disabled ipv6.method ignore

OR

# nmcli con add type bond con-name bond0 ifname bond0 mode active-backup ipv4.method disabled ipv6.method ignore ipv4.addresses 10.3.0.10/24 ipv4.gateway 10.3.0.1 ipv4.dns “192.168.0.46 192.168.0.51 192.168.0.224” ipv4.method manual

OR

# nmcli con add type bond con-name bond0 ifname bond0 mode active-backup ipv6.method ignore ipv4.addresses 10.3.0.10/24 ipv4.gateway 10.3.0.1 ipv4.dns “192.168.0.46 192.168.0.51 192.168.0.224” ipv4.method manual

# nmcli con add type bond-slave con-name enp2s0f0 ifname enp2s0f0 master bond0
# nmcli con add type bond-slave con-name enp2s0f1 ifname enp2s0f1 master bond0
# nmcli con add type bond-slave con-name enp3s0f0 ifname enp3s0f0 master bond0
# nmcli con add type bond-slave con-name enp3s0f1 ifname enp3s0f1 master bond0

NOTE:  There is no IP assignment above.  Not needed.  That will go on the br01 interface as before. Activate the connection:

# nmcli c up ifcfg-enp2s0f0
# nmcli c up ifcfg-enp2s0f0
# nmcli c up ifcfg-enp2s0f0
# nmcli c up ifcfg-enp2s0f0

Activate the bond0 interface:

# nmcli con up bond0

Next, reestablish the bridge interface.  IMPORTANT NOTE:  This time the bond0 is added, not the individual physical NIC:

# virsh net-list –all
# nmcli con add ifname br0 type bridge con-name br0 ipv4.addresses 10.3.0.10/24 ipv4.gateway 10.3.0.1 ipv4.dns “192.168.0.46 192.168.0.51 192.168.0.224” ipv4.method manual

Bridges need all interfaces to be added.  NOTE: bond0 of type bridge is incompatible it appears:

# nmcli con add type bridge-slave ifname bond0 master br0
# nmcli con add type bridge-slave ifname enp2s0f0 master br0
# nmcli con add type bridge-slave ifname enp2s0f1 master br0
# nmcli con add type bridge-slave ifname enp3s0f0 master br0
# nmcli con add type bridge-slave ifname enp3s0f1 master br0

# nmcli c up bridge-slave-enp2s0f0
# nmcli c up bridge-slave-enp2s0f1
# nmcli c up bridge-slave-enp3s0f0
# nmcli c up bridge-slave-enp3s0f1

# (optional, not working) nmci c add type vlan con-name vlan0 ifname bond0.0 dev bond0 id 0 master br0 slave-type bridge
# nmcli c s

Test by starting the virtual machine defined earlier:

virsh # start mc-rocky01.nix.mds.xyz
Domain ‘mc-rocky01.nix.mds.xyz’ started

virsh #

Then ping the physical host:

C:\Users\tom>ping 10.3.0.10 -t

Pinging 10.3.0.10 with 32 bytes of data:
Reply from 10.3.0.10: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=62
Reply from 10.3.0.10: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=62

And ping the KVM VM as well:

C:\Users\tom>ping 10.3.0.179 -t

Pinging 10.3.0.179 with 32 bytes of data:
Reply from 10.3.0.179: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=62
Reply from 10.3.0.179: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=62

After all is said and done, the interfaces:

[root@dl380g6-p02 ~]# nmcli c
NAME                   UUID                                  TYPE      DEVICE
br0                    a080d0c1-3828-4595-b08f-ed6854354660  bridge    br0
bond0                  ca5a28e1-6bb0-4f43-b2b3-73af73fb877f  bond      bond0
virbr0                 19b49e05-eea8-43ce-be68-a52e50c774b0  bridge    virbr0
vnet0                  05bb4b3f-834a-4a07-b9bf-a3cf22ad5d76  tun       vnet0
bridge-slave-enp2s0f0  7a6300eb-7cbe-4629-97af-a49adc2c15a9  ethernet  enp2s0f0
bridge-slave-enp2s0f1  1eebfee8-b27d-4579-a605-768282c579cd  ethernet  enp2s0f1
bridge-slave-enp3s0f0  a5b96f1f-0d1f-4773-b2fe-243c382aa51b  ethernet  enp3s0f0
bridge-slave-enp3s0f1  a38f12f8-c7af-4047-b024-3d15cadc7eda  ethernet  enp3s0f1

bridge-slave-bond0     97b2404f-a056-452b-a081-d27f7645fb75  ethernet  —
enp2s0f0               750293af-2d1d-4d18-bd75-4b29324afd10  ethernet  —
enp2s0f1               c8261b81-f318-4114-817e-77019d6ff404  ethernet  —
enp3s0f0               09be1a9d-b9f4-4748-8a0a-4793a9426245  ethernet  —
enp3s0f1               b1a8b75e-abec-4488-8f15-d576a4048ed9  ethernet  —

Use the following command to test failover capability:

# ip link set dev enp2s0f0 down
# ip link set dev enp2s0f1 down
# ip link set dev enp3s0f0 down
# ip link set dev enp3s0f1 down

# ip link set dev enp2s0f0 up
# ip link set dev enp2s0f1 up
# ip link set dev enp3s0f0 up
# ip link set dev enp3s0f1 up

As noted above, bond interfaces appear to be incompatible with bridges in Rocky 8+ / RHEL 8+ / CentOS 8+ whereas for RHEL 7 clones, it’s sufficient to add the bond0 to br0:

You’re now set with bonding and redundancy on the KVM side!

COMING UP!

UI and Cockpit installation (Plus any other goodies I’ll think of before completing this post)

Cheers,
TK

REF: RHEL7: https://access.redhat.com/documentation/en-us/red_hat_enterprise_linux/7/html/networking_guide/sec-vlan_on_bond_and_bridge_using_the_networkmanager_command_line_tool_nmcli
REF: RHEL 8: https://access.redhat.com/documentation/en-us/red_hat_enterprise_linux/8/html/configuring_and_managing_networking/configuring-a-network-bridge_configuring-and-managing-networking#configuring-a-network-bridge-using-nmcli-commands_configuring-a-network-bridge

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